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Upcoming Agile Events

Recurring MONTHLY Events:
1st Tuesday
-North Meeting : 3rd Thursday-South Meeting : 4th Thursday-Agile Lean Coffee

04/05

Desert Code Camp
Panel: Implementing Agile in the real world Time: 11:30 am Room: IRN-208
Gilbert Community College Pecos Campus
2626 E Pecos Road, Chandler, AZ 85225
Map  -  Floor Plan

04/10

Scaling with Feature vs. Component Teams to achieve Fast, Flexible, Flow  - 6:00 pm @Infusionsoft  (Google Map) [South Meeting]

04/24

Monthly Agile Lean Coffee - 7:00 am @ Paradise Bakery  (Google Map) [Lean Coffee]

04/14 – 04/17

(4/14-4/15) CSM Training with Mike Vizdos 
(4/16-4/17) CSPO Training with Catherine Louis
($200 of with “PHXSUG” discount code)

05/06

TBD – 6:00 pm @Axosoft  (Google Map)  [North Meeting]

05/14 – 05/15

Certified ScrumMaster (CSM) Training with Daniel Gullo

Posted in Meeting Announcements.


[South Meeting] April 10th Scaling with Feature vs. Component Teams to Achieve Fast, Flexible, Flow

Where:
Infusionsoft    (Google Map)
1260 S. Spectrum Blvd.
Chandler, AZ 85286

Cost:  All PHXSUG meetings are Free.

** Please note the date change. April South Meeting has been moved up by a week to April 10th.  **

Agenda:
6:00 -  Registration – Free Food and Drink (Infusionsoft Sponsoring)
6:25 -  Announcements
6:30 -  Begin the Meeting
8:00 –  Closing Messages and Announcements [Wait till end to find out if you are the lucky one to get a complimentary copy of Essential Scrum, Ken' book ]

Topic Overview:  Scaling with Feature vs. Component Teams to Achieve Fast, Flexible, Flow.

Using agile with one team and one product backlog is straightforward. But, how do we scale to support larger products/projects that involve more people than can reasonably fit on a single team? Many organizations frequently choose to structure their teams at scale using the strongly held opinion of some individual or group in a position of authority.
For example, many large organizations that I encounter have historically organized teams around skills, geography, architectural layers, or components (reusable pieces of technology). They are familiar with these “proven” approaches and see no reason to migrate to a different pattern when scaling with agile. This can be, and frequently is, disastrous for these companies. For example, many organizations that I encounter heavily favor component teams at the expense of feature teams (a team organized around the delivery of a set of features). In these organizations, the highly interdependent nature of component teams can significantly block the work (frequently up to 90% of the time or more).
That doesn’t mean, however, that these scaling approaches are inherently wrong or should be eliminated altogether. For example, it is common to see agile practitioners overreact to the problem of too many component teams by recommending the elimination all component teams, which can be equally harmful to the bottom line. Sometimes having a component team that owns a particular asset area is economically the proper solution.
How, then, can organizations determine if one scaling approach is better than another? Given the diversity of organizations and the work that they do, it would be naive to assume that one type of team is always superior to another in all situations. In this session I describe and then apply an economic framework for making informed tradeoffs when considering whether to scale with component teams, feature teams, or a blended model. By considering the economic consequences of our choices, we can address multi-team waste and better achieve the fast, flexible flow of features while maintaining the integrity of core components.
Learning Objectives:  
  • Be able to return to their organizations and make informed team scaling choices that appropriately balance tradeoffs
  • Understand the importance of fast, flexible flow as an overarching goal when designing teams structures at scale
  • Learn to apply an economic framework for evaluating whether one scaling solution is better than another (e.g., provides better fast, flexible flow characteristics)
  • Understand the issues and benefits of feature and component teams to better appreciate how to use each appropriately to achieve fast, flexible, flow
  • Understand the benefits of blended team solutions
  • Understand scaling patterns for how to maintain the conceptual integrity and reusability of components even when component teams are lightly used
** Please note the date change. April South Meeting has been moved up by a week to April 10th.  **
Speaker Bio:  Ken Rubin

Ken is Managing Principal at Innolution, a company that provides Scrum and agile training and coaching to help companies develop products in an effective and economically sensible way. A Certified Scrum Trainer, Ken has trained over 20,000 people on agile and Scrum, Kanban, Smalltalk development, managing object-oriented projects, and transition management. He has coached over 200 companies, ranging from start-ups to Fortune 10.
Ken was the first managing director of the worldwide Scrum Alliance. He is the author of the Amazon #1 best-selling book Essential Scrum: A Practical Guide to the Most Popular Agile Process. He is also the creator of the Visual AGILExicon®, a freely available set of vibrant, four-color icons for composing graphically rich and visually appealing three dimensional representations of agile and Scrum concepts.

Posted in Meeting Announcements, South Meeting.


[North Meeting] April 1st – Make Agile Games

Where:  Axosoft    (Google Map)
13835 N. Northsight Boulevard #205
Scottsdale, AZ 85260

Cost: Free. All PHXSUG meetings are Free.

Agenda:
6:00 -  Registration – Food and Drink (Sponsored by Medix – www.medixteam.com/IT)
6:25 -  Announcements
6:30 -  Begin the Meeting
8:00 -  Closing Messages and Announcements

PLEASE REGISTER - If you are already a member of the Phoenix Scrum User’s Group, you have already received an email about this event, just select the “Registration Link” in that email.  If you’ve not signed-up yet, please sign-up (on the right), and we’ll get an email out to you!!

Topic Overview:  Make Agile Games

Games can bring fun to your work. Learn how to create your own Agile games using the PLAID Framework.

http://tastycupcakes.org/2011/07/agile-game-incubator-agile-games-2011/

Learning Objectives:

* Learn how to use the PLAID framework to easily create Agile games

* Create your own game

* Have fun

Speaker Bio:

Jade Meskil

Jade is passionate about transforming organizations of all sizes to recognize and embrace the latent power of their greatest resource – people. His success is build upon a foundation of maintaining trust, understanding the needs of individuals, and enabling teams to succeed on their own terms.

Jade offers clients his deep knowledge of Agile methodologies, team and individual behaviors, facilitation, organizational management, as well as a breadth of knowledge in technical best practices and disciplined software development.

Posted in Meeting Announcements, North Meeting.


POST EVENT UPDATE – Product Owner Panel

Hi Everyone,

The Product Owner Panel session seemed to be a relatively hot topic.  We had about 35 engaged attendees.  I also had a relatively large number of people email me and let me know that something had come up and they couldn’t attend. Every “I can’t attend” email asked if we could post notes or blog posts.  In the past, we haven’t done it because I’m usually simply too busy to be focused on taking notes, and this time was no exception.  However, after this meeting, I asked if anyone had taken notes to please send them, and I’d post them on the site.  Great News!  It’s like having “guest reporters!”  I received a couple sets of notes, so I’ve posted them below (if I get more notes later, I’ll post them also).

A special thanks to our “guest reporters” Allan Dean and Dave Woodbury.

From Allan Dean

Q:  What’s the hardest thing to do as a Product Owner?

A1:  Say no.

A2:  Drowning the puppies (i.e. letting your favorite features go).

Q:  What about a Product Owner’s AKA (Authority, Knowledge, Availability) – how important are they and can any be learned?

A:   Yes – can learn to be more Knowledgeable (about the Customer, about the product/service, about technolology, about methodology and process).

A:  Yes – a product owner needs and has authority, but it’s largely informal authority.

A:  Yes – availability is critical.  As product owner you must be available to the team, and be careful about taking on even little extra jobs in/around product launch (release) dates.  Chat and email is not the same as being right there with your team.

Q:  Annual release versus continuous release (iterative approaches) – what drives an organization to appreciate and adopt a continuous release approach?

A:  Long story short – a burning platform.  When faced with customers needing relief right this minute and your product team is faced with a new crisis plus a backlog of 6,000 defects aged over 3 years… delete them all, start fresh with what matters most to your customers in terms of delivering value to them today.  Do that… release that feature.  Then evaluate again, and do the next most valuable bit.  Dig yourself out of “the red zone” (as a team) and with several iterations significant progress is made… and BTW a new process (iterative, continuous release) has begun.

Q:  What’s your process (or filter) for moving from an initial ask for “X” to a prototype?

A1:  (long and complex)
A2:  I ask myself – Is “X” a major change or a minor tweak for us?  Is “X” something our customers are doing already (with our product), or something they can’t do yet (i.e. an unmet need)?

A3:  Prototyping… 1st start conversation in the simplest, easiest form… “on paper”, then in “low fidelity” …even just clicking thru…, then move it up to “high fidelity” (detail).

Q:  What do you do as Product Owner when there is a disconnect between the customer (market) and your company’s product (service) offering?
A:  Data! Data! Data!  #1 Go talk to the customer and listen.  Find the voice of the customer.  #2 Get the data.  #3 Interpret the data (make meaning).  #4 Then tell your “story” that makes the data meaningful and influences your stakeholders (i.e. brings them together, like a Venn Diagram).

Q:  What’s your data collection process like?
A:  Conversations, lots of them.  Some techniques:
i.  Try out a “Hello email” to your existing customers that are 2yo…

ii.  Have internal stakeholder conversations with other departments… customer/field/product support, help/service desk, sales win/loss analysis (When and why do customers walk away?  When and why do we not win new customers?), and marketing (where is the market going; competitive forces; our market’s dynamics).

iii.  Use satisfaction surveys and polling with your customers.  NPS – net promoter score (identify your attractors and distractors).

Q:  What does a Product Owner do?  Who would you pick to be a Product Owner?  What do you look for in a Product Owner?

A1:  They discern “the What” (is to be developed).  They define the “Use case” for it.  And they establish “the definition of done”.

A2:  They play well with others.

A3:  They are someone committed to nurturing a culture of empowerment… it’s always about the people…  because that’s how you build a high performing team.

Follow up :  Yes – organizational change and process factors in too, but cultivating the right culture is the key.  And it often sounds like… do more with less… lead by example (hard work but it feels better)… get LEAN… accept failure (and iterate quickly).

Q:  Do you actually write the user stories?

A1:  Yes – I write the User Stories.  Writing them, tweaking them, having meetings with senior stakeholders too.  Then I build (groom) the Backlog, and shape the sprint/s.

A2:  After we develop the Solution Design, then come User Stories.  My technique is to 1st draw out the Epics, and then I do Small Stories that I shop (vett) with my QA and these become our User Stories we review for our Sprint/s, then the Backlog (new stuff and drawing in some defect/bug work too).

A3:  I used to write all the User Stories by myself because, “I’m the Product Owner.”  Now I share it with the Team as our shared task.  I throw a “Backlog Party” (for grooming).  I still write the Basic Story (without acceptance criteria), but then the whole team crafts the User Story with acceptance criteria.  Whenever I drift into defining “How” to do it, I stop and take it back up a level.

Q:  What are 3 tips for Product Owners?

A1:  1st – Don’t be afraid to say, “No.”  2nd – Be a Product Owner, not a Project Manager.  3rd – Have fun.

A2:  1st – Get in bed with the Customer (not literally).  Connect with your customer’s story; why does it inspire you?  2nd – Involve the Team early and often.  3rd – Things go much better when you remember these are people (not just a team as a unit – but made of individuals)… so take the time to ask some irrelevant questions and get to know each of them, because your team will become much more capable (builds more trust).

A3:  1st – Live the culture.  2nd – Do “customer development” > leads you to the Data > gives you influence over “unsure stakeholders”.  3rd – If you build the relationship, you can get people to do anything.  It’s always about the people – the ones you work with and the ones you serve.

From Dave Woodbury

Topic: Product Owner Panel
Date: March 20, 2014
Description: http://phxsug.org/meeting/south-meeting-march-20th-product-owner-panel

The meeting opened with a welcome and introduction by Perry Reinert, followed by introductions of and by the panelists.  Perry observed that the panelists represent companies whose sizes range from 40 (Jeff Schinella, Axosoft) to 400 (Sarahjane Isom, Infusionsoft)  to 40,000 (Josey Borman, Pearson).  You can read more about the three panelists Josey, Sarahjane and Jeff here: (http://phxsug.org/meeting/south-meeting-march-20th-product-owner-panel).  The Phoenix Scrum User’s Group meetings are always fantastic, and the 30 minutes of food and drink sponsored by Infusionsoft, followed by 90 minutes of panel discussion was just right for this topic.

Perry kicked off the discussion by asking if anyone had heard of the acronym, AKA which stands for some desirable characteristics of a product owner.  (Authority, Knowledge, Availability) He asked the panelists their thoughts on the acronym and relative importance of each trait.  Sarahjane mentioned that a product owner has to be available to do the things that a product owner must do, otherwise all the knowledge and authority won’t be of much help.  The product owner has to show-up and be engaged.  Josey answered that its difficult to find a product owner with all three traits, but that authority and availability are essential.  A person can always seek out and obtain the necessary knowledge.

After the opening question, the panelists and the audience were warmed up and I noted the following items during each of the panelists’ answers.  I was so busy writing down the pearls of wisdom that I didn’t always note the panelist’s name, so my apologies for any lack of attribution.

1. You might be better off pressing the reset button if your backlog of stories or defects gets to be too large to manage.  As a product owner, you want to lead the team to deliver working, usable releases within a short period of time, and that requires focusing the team on a small number of important things that must get done.  Josey said that she asks people “What is the minimal thing you can do to be successful?”

2. Sarahjane mentioned the importance of the voice of the customer a few times and said that many of Infusionsoft’s customers are looking for the software to help them get a task done as efficiently as possible so that they can move on to other things or go home for the day.

3. I liked Josey’s comment about bringing the big comprehensive product vision down to something really small that the team can deliver into the customer’s hands as soon as possible.

4. Each of the panelists agreed on the importance of data regarding how products are being used to determine priorities.  They said that one of the hardest (and most important) duties of the product owner is to say no to things so that the team can work on the highest priority items.  Having data from and about the actual users of the product is how the product owner can help guide the team and make decisions about what to prioritize in a sprint.  Having good data also enables the product owner to identify benefits associated with new features that can then be shared with executives and other key stakeholders.

5. There was also agreement around the importance of communication. One of the panelists noted that the product owner serves the team well by clearly communicating the status of the project and avoiding minimizing problems or overselling accomplishments.    Keeping people in the loop, building relationships and trust, taking interest in team members as individuals, and recognizing that the product owner is a member of the team with specific roles rather than the manager of the team or a project manager.

6. Josey shared that Infusionsoft has many people looking at the entire user experience of their customers from many perspectives. They gather data via surveys, customer support calls and conversations with customers.  Customers that cancel their subscriptions get special attention.

7. There were questions from the audience regarding (1) how to move oneself into a product owner role and-or how to encourage management to adopt an agile culture and approach to software development (2) How to best support new product owners – e.g., people who are new to the product owner role but otherwise have experience with the company’s products and business processes.  The panelists answers were fantastic but unfortunately I didn’t capture many notes on these!

8. One of the panelists emphasized the importance of following the process on the part of developers, especially when they are asked to work on things in addition to the sprint backlog.  The proper response is for the developer to deflect the requests back to the product owner, but it was noted that this can be very hard if not impossible for some developers.

9. Another panelist, when asked about important attributes of the product owner said that it was less important to be a product expert and that it is best to avoid putting an engineer in the product owner role because invariably an engineer cannot avoid specifying how things must be done.  Instead, teams need product owners who focus on three things: (1) Use Case (2) Problem to solve (3) Definition of done.

10.  Product owners must promote the agile culture of empowerment.  Agile is about people and a product owner needs to be someone who plays well with others.

11. The panelists were asked if they write user stories.  Jeff said Yes, based on data, voice of the customer, and other feedback.  Sarahjane also said yes, but only after detailed design has been completed.  Sarahjane hinted at a meta-process in use at Infusionsoft named POV or something like that, but did not elaborate.  Josey said that it is very hard for a product owner to write user stories. She treats it as a shared responsibility, writing just the basic structure and then working with the team to flesh out acceptance criteria and so on.  This avoids user stories that are essentially “As a product owner I want… “ instead of “As a student I want…” or “As a teacher I want…”

12. Perry asked the last question – “What are a few tips that you would give product owners?” going over a few SUG announcements to give the panelists some time to form their answers. Jeff answered don’t be afraid to say no, and to be a product owner, not a project manager.  Sarahjane recommends that product owners form close relationships with customer, and involve everyone on the team early and often, keeping in mind that the product owner is not a dictator.  She emphasized that everyone is an individual and that it pays to make the effort to get to know everyone on the team, even some of the more introverted engineers that take extra effort to get to know. :-)   Josey said to live the agile culture.  Develop your customers and get data about users.  If you build relationships with people you can get anyone to do anything.

Posted in Meeting Announcements.


[South Meeting] March 20th – Product Owner Panel

Where:
Infusionsoft    (Google Map)
1260 S. Spectrum Blvd.
Chandler, AZ 85286

Cost: There is no cost to attend this session. It’s a free event.

Agenda:
6:00 -  Registration – Free Food and Drink (Infusionsoft Sponsoring)
6:25 -  Announcements
6:30 -  Begin the Panel
8:00 – Closing Messages and Announcements

PLEASE REGISTER - If you are already a member of the Phoenix Scrum User’s Group, you have already received an email about this event, just select the “Registration Link” in that email.  If you’ve not received that email, please sign-up (on the right), and we’ll get it out to you!!

Topic Overview:  Product Owner Panel

This is going to be great!  Some of the biggest challenges in Scrum are related to product and the product owner role.  On this panel, we have multiple product owners available to describe their job and their process.  We have Product Owners from three very different sized companies – Axosoft, Infusionsoft, and Pearson!  We’ll hear about their biggest challenges, and also what helps make their job easier and what they feel helps their teams be most productive and produce better products.  Our goal is to have some real discussions from real product owners who do the job.  The moderator will ask a few questions to get things going…and then turn the questioning over to the audience.  This will be a great opportunity to hear from successful product owners (from different sized companies) about things that work and don’t work.

Panel Member:  Josey Borman, Pearson

Josey has been a Product owner for the last 3 years at Pearson. During that time, she has seen and done a lot, including:

  • Managed a $50M supplemental digital solution including product strategy, development, and deployment
  • Implemented agile frameworks on multiple teams including:  curriculum development, product development and technology, using SCRUM, Kanban and lean start-up methodologies
  • Transformed product development from an annual release mechanism to continuous release deployment for both installed and cloud-based customers
  • Transformed digital curriculum development from waterfall to lean development practices and deployment models

Panel Member:  SarahJane Isom, Infusionsoft

For the last two years, Sarahjane has been a product Owner at Infusionsoft.  She started on this career path by studying Marine Biology on the North Shore of Oahu. However, once she received her Bachelors Degree, she and her husband moved to AZ to pursue masters degrees.  Life took an unexpected turn for Sarahjane when the former Chief Product Officer (CPO) of Infusionsoft convinced her to come work in Product Management. Since her start with Infusionsoft in June of 2012 she has led Infusionsoft’s mobile team to successfully launch the company’s first two native mobile apps.  She is a strategic, analytical, thinker who loves to solve problems.

Panel Member:  Jeff Schinella, Axosoft

Jeff has been at Axosoft for about two and one-half years and has been a Product Owner for the past year.  Before working as a Product Owner, Jeff worked in UX and Design where he was responsible for creating great product designs.  Since taking on the role of Product Owner, Jeff is now responsible for typical Product Owner duties, including creating/”owning” the backlog, making sure stories are ready for the team, and ensuring team product questions get answered quickly. 

Posted in Meeting Announcements.


[North Meeting] March 4th – Behavior Driven Development

Where:  Axosoft    (Google Map)
13835 N. Northsight Boulevard #205
Scottsdale, AZ 85260

Cost: All PHXSUG meetings are Free.

Agenda:
6:00 -  Registration – Food and Drink (Infusionsoft Sponsoring)
6:25 -  Announcements
6:30 -  Begin the Meeting
8:00 -  Closing Messages and Announcements

PLEASE REGISTER - If you are already a member of the Phoenix Scrum User’s Group, you have already received an email about this event, just select the “Registration Link” in that email.  If you’ve not received that email, please sign-up (on the right), and we’ll get it out to you!!

Topic Overview:  Behavior Driven Development

This presentation will cover a high-level discussion on the evolution from TDD to BDD. We will also provide a high-level overview of Gherkin and Cucumber and their use with BDD.

“BDD is a second-generation, outside-in, pull-based, multiple-stakeholder, multiple-scale, high-automation, agile methodology. It describes a cycle of interactions with well-defined outputs, resulting in the delivery of working, tested software that matters.” – Dan North, Creator of BDD.

Speaker Bio:

Pete Williams

Pete is currently a Lead Project Manager / Agile Coach at a leading financial global company. He has 20+ year of Project Management and 12 years of Agile experience.

Andres X Escobar

Andres is a software professional with experience in automated test engineering, web application development, and Android development. He is currently working as a Test Automation Engineer for a global IT consulting and services company.

Posted in Meeting Announcements, North Meeting.


[South Meeting] Feb 20th – Scaled Agile Framework® Overview – Is it right for your organization?

Where:
Infusionsoft    (Google Map)
1260 S. Spectrum Blvd.
Chandler, AZ 85286

Cost: There is no cost to attend this session. It’s a free event.

Agenda:
6:00 -  Registration – Free Food and Drink (Infusionsoft Sponsoring)
6:25 -  Announcements
6:30 -  Begin the Meeting
8:00 –  Closing Messages and Announcements

PLEASE REGISTER - If you are already a member of the Phoenix Scrum User’s Group, you have already received an email about this event, just select the “Registration Link” in that email.  If you’ve not received that email, please sign-up (on the right), and we’ll get it out to you!!

Topic Overview:  Scaled Agile Framework® Overview – Is it right for your organization?

The Scaled Agile Framework® (SAFe™) (http://www.scaledagileframework.com) has become a popular topic of discussion in the Agile community.  SAFe is a publicly available framework that is an interactive knowledge base for implementing Agile practices at enterprise scale.

Come hear an overview about how SAFe can potentially help you with the delivery of large Agile initiatives. The discussion will also include pros and cons of the framework based on personal experiences with implementing the SAFe framework at large organizations, and tips that you can take back to the office and implement right away.

Speaker Bio:  Troy Plant

Troy is a Managing Director / Agile Consultant at Davisbase Consulting, LLC.    He has more than 12 years of experience working in the software development field and has a diverse background in development, business analysis, product and project management roles. His strong background in Agile methodologies has presented him with opportunities to coach and train teams in the US, England, Romania, Moldova, and France.

His breadth of knowledge regarding the complete software development life cycle provides a deep understanding of challenges organizations face from startups to Fortune 500 companies. He is currently a SAFe Program Consultant (SPC), Certified Scrum Professional (CSP), Pragmatic Marketing Certified, and is actively involved in his local Agile community when not traveling.

Posted in Meeting Announcements, South Meeting.


[North Meeting] February 4th – Complexity Theory and Why Waterfall Development Works (Sometimes)

Where:  Axosoft    (Google Map)

13835 N. Northsight Boulevard #205
Scottsdale, AZ 85260

Agenda:
6:00 -  Registration – Food and Drink (Infusionsoft Sponsoring)
6:25 -  Announcements
6:30 -  Begin the Meeting
8:00 -  Closing Messages and Announcements

PLEASE REGISTER - If you are already a member of the Phoenix Scrum User’s Group, you have already received an email about this event, just select the “Registration Link” in that email.  If you’ve not received that email, please sign-up (on the right), and we’ll get it out to you!!

Topic Overview:  Complexity Theory and Why Waterfall Development Works (Sometimes)

A huge debate rages on in IT these days. There are two rival camps – traditionalists who subscribe to the “waterfall” methodologies and agilists. Most recent evidence suggests that agile methodologies have an edge in project success rates but the traditional methods are still widely practiced and do result in some project successes. There are reasons for the successes of agile and traditional projects that can be explained by complexity theory. This presentation will examine some interesting information about waterfall and agile methodologies and show why complexity theory can help us to predict the relative success (and failure) of applying these methodologies to software development projects.

Speaker Bio: Larry Apke

Larry Apke has over 6 year’s real-world experience as a scrum master, agile coach, consultant and software development manager and over 15 years of total IT experience with his own and other companies. His passion is to help people create high-quality software on a regular basis. He is a regular speaker on Agile topics, an active member of Agile user groups, founder of the San Antonio Agile Coffee. He currently works as an Agile Coach and Principal Consultant for Mindtree.

Posted in Meeting Announcements, North Meeting.

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[South Meeting] January 16th – Lessons Learned adopting Agile and Changing Culture at Big Companies

Where:
Infusionsoft    (Google Map)
1260 S. Spectrum Blvd.
Chandler, AZ 85286

Agenda:
6:00 -  Registration – Food and Drink (Infusionsoft Sponsoring)
6:25 -  Announcements
6:30 -  Begin the Meeting
8:00 –  Closing Messages and Announcements

PLEASE REGISTER - If you are already a member of the Phoenix Scrum User’s Group, you have already received an email about this event, just select the “Registration Link” in that email.  If you’ve not received that email, please sign-up (on the right), and we’ll get it out to you!!

Topic Overview:  Lessons Learned adopting Agile and Changing Culture at Big Companies

Agile adoption is easy when you’re a startup with only a few people. Not so much when you’re a large company with an established culture and process. Come hear the ongoing lessons learned from adopting agile at two established tech companies (Pearson and GoDaddy). David Foster (Pearson) and Mike Bovich (GoDaddy) will share their insights on pushing for change within their orgs and the power of collaborating across company lines.

Speaker Bio:  Michael Bovich

People Hacker, Geek, Father of two, nerdy dancer, cat herder (literally and figuratively) and Director of Development (Web Hosting) at GoDaddy.   Mike leads the teams responsible for developing GoDaddy’s line of hosting products.

Speaker Bio:  David Foster

Principal Architect at Pearson Learning Services Technology in Chandler, Az. David has over 15 years of experience working with teams large and small, in agile and non-agile environments. As a Principal Architect for Pearson, he works with the product management and development teams to provide technical guidance for their product development.

Posted in Meeting Announcements, South Meeting.


[North Meeting] January 7th – Value Stream Mapping

UPDATE: Slides from the presentation are available for download from Dropbox.

Where:  Axosoft    (Google Map)
13835 N. Northsight Boulevard #205
Scottsdale, AZ 85260

Agenda:
6:00 -  Registration – Food and Drink (Infusionsoft Sponsoring)
6:25 -  Announcements
6:30 -  Begin the Meeting
8:00 -  Closing Messages and Announcements

PLEASE REGISTER - If you are already a member of the Phoenix Scrum User’s Group, you have already received an email about this event, just select the “Registration Link” in that email.  If you’ve not received that email, please sign-up (on the right), and we’ll get it out to you!!

Topic Overview:  Value Stream Mapping

Agile ways of working always include the idea of improvement. We do retrospectives and review results of our work often. We seek to improve our individual skills and our focus on our users. We do these things to improve what we do, to improve the actions we take. What if we could find startling and significant improvements that are often hiding in plain sight?

Value Stream Mapping is a technique that helps expose often hidden places of waste and difficulty. It helps us understand the path from idea to delivery so that we see our system, not just the things we do in the system. We will build a theoretical (or real) value stream so you can do it for yourself. Then we will look at how it can be used to find areas of exploration for improvement, or even ways to improve literally overnight!

Speaker Bio:  Alan Dayley

Alan brings more than 25 years of software engineering experience to his Agile Coaching practice. Agile Coach, Certified ScrumMaster, Certified Scrum Product Owner, Certified Scrum Professional. Alan works with teams and management in strengthening the people side of creative work. “So much of success with your product depends on how your people interact with each other. Agile principles and frameworks help create the focus to build great people and interactions. A great product becomes a natural result” – See more at:  http://www.bigvisible.com/author/adayley/.

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